Legal Part 4: Trash

THE LETTERS FROM THE UNDERGROUND PORTION OF THE BLOG DERIVES ITSELF FROM MY MISSIONS WORK IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING. NOT INTENTIONALLY TAKEN FROM DOSTOEVSKY, THESE ARE THE POSTS WHERE I STRAY FROM THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND GET DOWN TO THE NITTY GRITTY … Continue reading

Legal Part 3: Other Side of the Tracks

THE LETTERS FROM THE UNDERGROUND PORTION OF THE BLOG DERIVES ITSELF FROM MY MISSIONS WORK IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING. NOT INTENTIONALLY TAKEN FROM DOSTOEVSKY, THESE ARE THE POSTS WHERE I STRAY FROM THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND GET DOWN TO THE NITTY GRITTY … Continue reading

Yom Kippur

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This weekend the Jewish calendar celebrates Yom Kippur—The Day of Atonement.

In the Old Testament the Day of Atonement was the one year that the High Priest would offer a sin offering for the nation of Israel. The ten days before (beginning with Rosh Hashanah the Jewish New Years) was a period of internal reflection and fasting as the individual considers his sins before God. The Day of Atonement is the Day when we come before God unable to atone for ourselves and see the burden of our sin forgiven. In the days of the temple, propitiation (appeasement) was given through the sacrifice of a goat on the alter. The blood of which would be sprinkled on the mercy seat over the arc of the covenant. This is the one-day that the priests would enter the Holy of Holies in the temple—to offer a sacrifice for the sins of the people.

Yom Kippur was also a time of vows for the Jewish people. Rosh Hashanah was the day when God would write the names of his people either in the book of death or the book of life. But he wouldn’t seal it until ten days after the New Year, giving the people a chance to repent.  On Yom Kippur he receives the repentance and seals the book. In this season let us examine ourselves. Don a life of sobriety and abstinence and seek out a deeper understanding of our own atonement.  In the Old Testament the sacrifice was an assurance that God had forgiven his people. And now we celebrate Yom Kippur recognizing that the sacrifice of Jesus is the final sign of God’s forgiveness. The details behind the ‘sign’ are elaborated here.

For more specifics about the custom and traditions check out this.