Legal Part 1: Sharon’s Bar and Brothel

THE LETTERS FROM THE UNDERGROUND PORTION OF THE BLOG DERIVES ITSELF FROM MY MISSIONS WORK IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING. NOT INTENTIONALLY TAKEN FROM DOSTOEVSKY, THESE ARE THE POSTS WHERE I STRAY FROM THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND GET DOWN TO THE NITTY GRITTY … Continue reading

Letters from the Underground: Defined by Beauty

THE LETTERS FROM THE UNDERGROUND PORTION OF THE BLOG DERIVES ITSELF FROM MY MISSIONS WORK IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING. NOT INTENTIONALLY TAKEN FROM DOSTOEVSKY, THESE ARE THE POSTS WHERE I STRAY FROM THE PHILOSOPHICAL AND GET DOWN TO THE NITTY GRITTY OF WHAT I DO ON MISSION.

 

 

Just a quick note about this ad, that I just HAD to post on because it reveals a nuance in the cultural/church gender role debate, of which I have been exploring in light of my missions work. I see a lot of objectification of both woman AND men. It’s pretty easy to see how the culture objectifies women. Our bodies are for sale everywhere. And if we aren’t willing to sell them, we’re chastised for being prudes or lesbians (I have been called both–what’s wrong with those terms anyways??). Of course, if we look a little deeper, underneath all of the blatant ways we make our women and young girls commodities for men to consume, we will find that our base assumption about men is as insulting. We may not ‘objectify’ them in the sense of turning them into a commodity (though we are coming closer and closer every day), but we frequently talk about men in the context of their hypersexuality as if they cannot possibly have dreams bigger than sex with as many women as possible.

So, if one were to open their eyes to the gender role/objectification debate there is no shortage of obvious examples for them to whiteness. But what isn’t so obvious, are the subtle things we embrace that create an environment where the obvious disrespect and degradation (of both genders) can continue to flourish. This ad speaks to one of those subtle things; and the reality is that the church embraces this as much as the culture.

It is not news that women make the world a more beautiful place. It is one of the biggest gifts that we bring to humanity. A woman’s beauty is uniquely her and uniquely her own and therefore should not be compared on a value scale. People are themselves, no one is the same, and therefore we cannot create a standard of people with which to compare others. But that is exactly what our culture has set out to do with beauty, and that is perhaps why our definition of beauty is often shallow, destructive, and objectifying. Let me be clear: A woman’s beauty was never meant to define her, her interests, or her position in society. But by primarily praising our daughters for their physical beauty we teach them to emphasize their physical beauty over their identity as a person–a perspective that is inherently objectifying.

Smart+Woman.+Nothing+to+describe_b1b732_3586066It is also a perspective that limits their potential and reinforces old, conservative standards for gender roles (a woman’s job is to be pretty and dainty, and make sure you don’t intimidate their men with intelligence or excellence). It could be that we only want to encourage our young girls to pursue interests or professions that we deem ‘appropriate’ for the role we assume they should take in family, church, and society. Instead of encouraging their natural gifts and abilities (gifts God has given them) we hold on to the one thing that is different from men and emphasize it, as if to say that physical beauty is what defines a woman as a woman. What we don’t realize is that in our attempts to maintain the traditional gender roles, we are institutionalizing a lie that the world is selling us. Mainly, that our daughter’s worth is in her body and her beauty and that she had better be good at that or she will fail as a woman.

A woman’s beauty will glorify God…but so will her intelligence, strength of character, and big dreams. Let’s help our daughters value themselves for more than their beauty. Let’s help them explore and achieve the identity that God has born in them; one that includes but is not limited to being beautiful.

 

Wreck the Temple

Wreck the Temple.

Church27It’s the night on the week before Easter celebrating Jesus throwing the money changers our of the temple. Religion and power had polluted the house of God. He went and threw them out. How do we celebrate that now? By getting all of our friends together, sharing a bottle of wine and laying out our complaints with the church today. What would you wreck?

I heard an interview once where the author said “I’m not going to bash the church, that would be too easy…” Indeed. I felt like this the first time I heard about ‘Wreck the Temple’. Criticism is always easy. Gaining popularity with non-believers by trashing the bride of Christ wasn’t exactly something I wanted to participate in. Bitter cynicism had already hurt my relationship with God and with other believers too much. I didn’t want to indulge. And really, what good would it do?

I didn’t understand.

JESUS wrecked the temple.

And if I’m honest with myself I want to wreck it. I do.

I have been in church all of my life. I have twenty five years of nonsense and betrayal—failure—that I carry with me. In the name of submission to authority and preserving unity they are quickly labeled as petty and bitter. Of course, if I’m just being petty and need to submit, I can’t forgive them. So I carry them.

Let me be clear: These aren’t actually petty things. I’m not mad because the music selection isn’t what I like. These are things like: going to the church in my deepest need and being turned away; years of never being accepted or embraced; always being on the outside and mocked for being different and being shut down when I have thoughts deeper and more challenging than the leadership. This doesn’t include the way I’ve seen the church fail my friends causing them to turn away from God altogether.

I don’t want to be disrespectful. I’m not interested in bitterly tearing down my brothers and sisters, but isn’t it time to be honest? Isn’t time to look at Jesus wrecking the temple and ask if we are Jesus or if we are the establishment that he would wreck?

We have a saying in our school assembly program “silence isn’t golden, it’s a weapon of evil to keep people enslaved”. I’m starting to realize that I’ve been silent too long; Silent out of respect, out of fear, and knowing that I can’t constructively criticize if I haven’t first forgiven. And that’s the crux of it. In order to righteously speak out, I have to wreck the temple first. I have to put the injustices on the table and turn it over, leave it in the past and speak justice right now. I have to be willing to forgive the church if just so my heart wont become bitter towards those who need to hear what I have to say now.

I missed the Wreck the Temple service in April. But I need to do it. I need to verbalize what I’ve spent years trying to deny—trying to hide. Transparency and vulnerability are not my strong points. Not when it comes to specifics. But I have to go through it. I have to be honest. Honesty towards the truth which will set me free.

Join me in wrecking the temple…what would you wreck?